History Curriculum

Our Curriculum Drivers are to promote resilience, develop communication and ensure all pupils have access to all learning possibilities both in and out of the classroom.

‘A people without the knowledge of their past history, origin and culture is like a tree without roots’ 
Marcus Garvey

Intent

Our Curriculum Intent is for pupils to know more, do more and learn more.

CUSP History draws upon prior learning, wherever the content is taught. The structure is built around the principles of advancing cumulative knowledge, chronology, change through cause and consequence, as well as making connections within and throughout periods of time studied.

CUSP History is planned so that the retention of knowledge is much more than just ‘in the moment knowledge’. The cumulative nature of the curriculum is made memorable by the implementation of Bjork’s desirable difficulties, including retrieval and spaced retrieval practice, word building and deliberate practice tasks. This powerful interrelationship between structure and research-led practice is designed to increase substantive knowledge and accelerate learning within and between study modules. That means the foundational knowledge of the curriculum is positioned to ease the load on the working memory: new content is connected to prior learning.

The effect of this cumulative model supports opportunities for children to associate and connect with significant periods of time, people, places and events. CUSP History strategically incorporates a range of modules that revisit, elaborate and sophisticate key concepts, events, people and places. A guiding principle of CUSP History is that pupils become ‘more expert’ with each study and grow an ever broadening and coherent mental timeline.

What do we teach

Substantive concepts such as Nationality, Rights, Society, Community, Democracy, Invasion, Civilisation, Power are taught from Y1 to Y6.

Year Group Area of Study:

  • EYFS
  • Understanding chronology and how things change over time
  • Recognising significant people in our lives and within our community
  • Year 1
  • Changes within living memory – What are the stages in my life?
  • The lives of significant people including, Mary Anning, David Attenborough and Neil Armstrong ( revisit)
  • Year 2
  • Events beyond living memory – The Great fire of London ( revisit)
  • Local History study – Victorian Times, Banardo, 1940
  • Year 3
  • Changes in Britian from the Stone Age to the Iron Age – with a Bronze and Iron Age comparison
  • The Roman Empire and its influence on Britain
  • Year 4
  • Britain settlement by Anglo-Saxon and Scots
  • The Viking and Anglo-Saxon struggle for the Kingdom of England to the time of Edward the Confessor
  • The achievements of the earliest civilisations – Ancient Egypt
  • Year 5
  • A non-European society that provides contrast with British History – Maya c AD 900. Compare location, settlement, people, culture and invention between Anglo-Saxon and Maya c AD 900
  • Ancient Greece – a study of Greek life and achievements and their influence on the western world.
  • Year 6
  • A study of an aspect or theme in British history that extends pupils’ knowledge beyond 1066 – The Windrush generation
  • A study of an aspect or theme in British history that extends pupils’ knowledge beyond 1066 – Monarchs through time

How do pupils learn

Each unit includes an overview for teacher which details the big idea that pupils will be studying, prior knowledge, skills to be taught through chronology, evidence and connecting history through time and common misconceptions to be challenged. 

Dual coded knowledge organisers contain core information for children to easily access and use as a point of reference and as a means of retrieval practise.  The sequence of learning makes clear essential and desirable knowledge, key questions and task suggestions for each lesson and suggested cumulative quizzing questions.

Retrieval practise is planned into the curriculum through spaced learning and interleaving and as part of considered task design by the class teacher.  Teaching and learning resources and provided for class teachers so they can focus their time on subject knowledge and task design.  Knowledge notes are an elaboration in the core knowledge found in knowledge organisers. 

Knowledge notes focus pupils’ working memory to the key question that will be asked at the end of the lesson.  It reduces cognitive load and avoids the split-attention effect. The units are supported by vocabulary modules which provide both resources for teaching and learning vital vocabulary and provide teachers with Tier 2 and 3 vocabulary with the etymology and morphology needed for explicit instruction details relevant idioms and colloquialisms to make this learning explicit. 

We aim to provide a high challenge with low threat culture and put no ceiling on any child’s learning, instead providing the right scaffolding for each child for them to achiev

How do we know what children have learned

  • Questioning
  • Pupil Book Study
  • Talking to techers
  • Low stakes ‘Drop-in’ observations
  • Quizzing and retrieval practise
  • Feedback and marking
  • Progress in book matches the curriculum inten

Geography Curriculum

Our Curriculum Drivers are to promote resilience, develop communication and ensure all pupils have access to all learning possibilities both in and out of the classroom.

‘You can travel the seas, poles and deserts and see nothing.  To really understand the world, you need to get under the skin of the people and places.  In other words, learn about geography.  I can’t imagine a subject more relevant in schools.’ 
Michael Palin

Intent

Our Curriculum Intent is for pupils to know more, do more and learn more.

A guiding principle of CUSP Geography is that each study draws upon prior learning.  High volume and deliberate practice is essential for pupils to remember and retrieve substantive knowledge and use their disciplinary knowledge to explain and articulate what they know. This means pupils make conscious connections and think hard, using what they know.

CUSP Geography is built around the principles of cumulative knowledge focusing on spaces, places, scale, human and physical processes with an emphasis on how content is connected and relational knowledge acquired. An example of this is the identification of continents, such as Europe, and its relationship to the location of the UK.

What do we teach

  • EYFS
  • Weather and seasonal changes
  • Transport and travel
  • People and communities
  • Year 1
  • continents
  • Oceans
  • Countries of the UK
  • Capital cities of the UK
  • Seas around the UK
  • The Equator
  • North and South Poles
  • Hot and cold places
  • School study (maps)
  • Year 2

Computing curriculum

Our Curriculum Drivers are to promote resilience, develop communication and ensure all pupils have access to all learning possibilities both in and out of the classroom.

‘Computing is not about computers any more. It is about living.’ Nichiolas Negroponte

Intent

Our Curriculum Intent is for pupils to know more, do more and learn more.

At John Scurr, we intend that children should master Computing to such an extent that they can go on to have careers within Computing and make use of Computing effectively in their everyday lives, without being completely reliant on technology.

Our children will be taught to use technology responsibly and carefully, being mindful of how their behaviour, words and actions can affect others.
Our children will be taught Computing in a way that ensures progression of skills, and follows a sequence to build on previous learning.

Our children will gain experience and skills of a wide range of technology in a way that will enhance their learning opportunities, enabling them to use technology across a range of subjects to be creative and solve problems, ensuring they make
progress.

What do we teach

  • EYFS
  • Computing systems and networks 1: Using a computer
  • Programming 1: All about instructions
  • Computing systems and networks 2: Exploring hardware
  • Programming 2: Programming Bee-Bots
  • Data handling: Introduction to data
  • Year 1
  • Computing systems and networks: Using a computer (‘Getting started’)
  • Programming 1: Algorithms unplugged
  • Skills showcase: Rocket to the moon
  • Programming 2: Bee-Bot
  • Creating media: Digital imagery
  • Data handling: Introduction to data
  • Online safety: Year 1
  • Year 2
  • Computing systems and networks 1: What is a computer?
  • Programming 1: Algorithms and debugging
  • Computing systems and networks 2: Word processing
  • Programming 2: ScratchJr
  • Creating media: Stop motion
  • Data handling: International Space Station
  • Online safety: Year 2
  • Year 3
  • Computing systems and networks 1: Networks and the internet
  • Programming: Scratch
  • Computing systems and networks 2: Emailing
  • Computing systems and networks 3: Journey inside a computer
  • Creating media: Video trailers (Previously called ‘Digital literacy’)
  • Data handling: Comparison cards databases
  • Online safety: Year 3
  • Year 4
  • Computing systems and networks: Collaborative learning
  • Programming 1: Further coding with Scratch
  • Creating media: Website design
  • Skills showcase: HTML
  • Programming 2: Computational thinking
  • Data handling: Investigating weather
  • Online safety: Year 4
  • Year 5
  • Computing systems and networks: Search engines
  • Programming 1: Music
  • Data handling: Mars Rover 1
  • Programming 2: Micro:bit
  • Creating media: Stop motion animation
  • Skills showcase: Mars Rover 2
  • Online safety: Year 5
  • Year 6
  • Computing systems and networks: Bletchley Park
  • Programming: Intro to Python
  • Data handling 1: Big Data 1
  • Creating media: History of computers
  • Data handling 2: Big Data 2
  • Skills showcase: Inventing a product
  • Online safety: Year 6

How do pupils learn

We follow a broad and balanced Computing curriculum that builds on previous learning and provides both support and challenge for learners. We follow a Computing scheme that ensures and progression of skills and covers all aspects of the Computing curriculum.

All classes will have a scheduled Computing lesson each week. Children’s work will be stored on Google Drive (if appropriate) for reference. We also record learning in a ‘Digital Diary’ that is updated with examples and comments related to the work in each lesson.

We want to ensure that Computing is embedded in our whole school curriculum and that opportunities for enhancing learning by using technology are always taken. Children are set Computing tasks as appropriate by their class teachers and are always encouraged to engage with online learning platforms at home.

How do we know what pupils have learned

  • Questioning
  • Digital diaries
  • Talking to teachers
  • Low stakes ‘Drop-in’ observations
  • Quizzing and retrieval practise
  • Feedback and marking
  • Progress in Digital Diaries matches the curriculum intent.

Design & Technology

Our Curriculum Drivers are to promote resilience, develop communication and ensure all pupils have access to all learning possibilities both in and out of the classroom.

‘Technology makes what was once impossible possible. The design makes it real.’ Michael Gagliano

Intent

Our Curriculum Intent is for pupils to know more, do more and learn more.

The CUSP Design and Technology curriculum is organised into blocks with each block covering a particular set of disciplines, including food and nutrition, mechanisms, structures, systems, electrical systems, understanding materials and textiles.

Vertical progression in each discipline has been deliberately woven into the fabric of the curriculum so that pupils revisit key disciplines throughout their Primary journey at increasing degrees of challenge and complexity. In addition to the core knowledge required to be successful within each discipline, the curriculum outlines key aspects of development in the Working as a Designer section.

Each module will focus on promoting different aspects of these competencies. This will support teachers in understanding pupils’ progress as designers more broadly, as well as how successfully they are acquiring the taught knowledge and skills.

What do we teach

  • Year 1
  • Mechanisms: Sliders and levers
  • Structures: Freestanding structures
  • Food and nutrition: Preparing fruit and vegetables
  • Understanding materials: Selecting materials
  • Textiles: Templates and joining techniques
  • Food and nutrition: Understanding a recipe
  • Year 2
  • Textiles: Exploring shape and texture
  • Food and nutrition: Following a recipe
  • Mechanisms: Axles and wheels
  • Understanding materials: Manipulating materials
  • Food and nutrition: Increasing our intake of fruit and vegetables
  • Structures: Freestanding structures with moving parts
  • Year 3
  • Textiles: Combining materials
  • Food and nutrition: A balanced and varied diet
  • Mechanisms: Levers and linkages
  • Electrical systems: Switches and circuits
  • Food and nutrition: Adapting a recipe
  • Structures: Developing strength in structures
  • Year 4
  • Food and nutrition: Food choices
  • Mechanisms: Hinges
  • Electrical systems: Switches and circuits revisited
  • Structures: Designing structures
  • Textiles: Fixings and fastenings
  • Food and nutrition: Understanding dietary requirements
  • Year 5
  • Food and nutrition: Eating seasonally
  • Mechanisms: Gears
  • Textiles: Making clothes last longer
  • Mechanisms: Pulleys
  • Structures: Developing stability in structures
  • Food and nutrition: Collaborating culture
  • Year 6
  • Food and nutrition: Eating ethically
  • Mechanisms: Gears
  • Food and nutrition: Eating on a budget
  • Structures: Designing structures REVISITED
  • Electrical systems: complex switches and circuits
  • Textiles; Sustainable materials

How do pupils learn

Each unit includes an overview for teacher which details the context within which the learning is set through a key learning question; prior knowledge; expected knowledge and skills outcomes; background information about designers relevant to the block of learning; and further points of consideration such as elements of DT that are covered and Health & Safety considerations.

Dual coded knowledge organisers contain core information for children to easily access and use as a point of reference and as a means of retrieval practise.  The sequence of learning makes clear essential and desirable knowledge, key question and task suggestions for each lesson. Detailed explanations of the core knowledge are planned into the lessons alongside technical vocabulary which children are encouraged to retrieve (from knowledge notes and lesson materials) and use in their discussions and work.

Retrieval practise is planned into the curriculum through spaced learning and interleaving and as part of considered task design by the class teacher.  Teaching and learning resources and provided for class teachers so they can focus their time on subject knowledge and task design.  Knowledge notes include the core knowledge for the block.

Knowledge notes focus pupils’ working memory to the key question that will be asked throughout the block.  It reduces cognitive load and avoids the split-attention effect. The units are supported by vocabulary modules which provide both resources for teaching and learning vital vocabulary.

How do we know what children have learned

  • Questioning
  • Pupil book study
  • Talking to teachers
  • Low stakes ‘Drop-in’ observations
  • Quizzing and retrieval practices
  • Feedback and marking
  • Progress in book matches the curriculum intent
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